Financial expert, columnist shares money tips with KSU community

Michelle+Singletary%2C+a+financial+columnist+for+The+Washington+Post+and+author+of+%E2%80%9CThe+Color+of+Money%2C%E2%80%9D+spoke++on+campus+Sept.+24+at+a+luncheon+sponsored+by+the+Federal+Reserve.
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Financial expert, columnist shares money tips with KSU community

Michelle Singletary, a financial columnist for The Washington Post and author of “The Color of Money,” spoke  on campus Sept. 24 at a luncheon sponsored by the Federal Reserve.

Michelle Singletary, a financial columnist for The Washington Post and author of “The Color of Money,” spoke on campus Sept. 24 at a luncheon sponsored by the Federal Reserve.

Kailen Olison

Michelle Singletary, a financial columnist for The Washington Post and author of “The Color of Money,” spoke on campus Sept. 24 at a luncheon sponsored by the Federal Reserve.

Kailen Olison

Kailen Olison

Michelle Singletary, a financial columnist for The Washington Post and author of “The Color of Money,” spoke on campus Sept. 24 at a luncheon sponsored by the Federal Reserve.

Donovan Green, Staff Writer

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Michelle Singletary, nationally known personal finance columnist, author, and daytime talk show host, was in live spirits as a recent luncheon speaker at KSU.

   The Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis- Louisville Branch annual lunch took place in the Student Center Ballroom on Sept. 24.

   Many students and staff of the university gathered to enjoy lunch and fellowship with each other while learning how to maintain financial stability. 

   Singletary, a Washington Post columnist, also shared a little of her life story, talking about how her father was so abusive, that her mother left the family, and that her father tried to burn down the house with everyone inside. 

   Luckily, her grandmother took Singletary and her siblings in, and that is where she first learned about financial stability and how to save.

   A main point she reiterated, was that the “rich stay rich by living like they’re broke, and the broke stay broke by living like they’re rich.” 

   She also told students to always keep the question “is it a need or a want?” in their head when thinking about spending money.

   She ended her presentation with a quote from her grandmother that she still lives by to this day: “It’s not what you have that matters, it’s how you make do with what you have.”